Topics

Achimenes
Annual Plants
African Violets
Amaryllis
American Holly
Apple Trees
Asparagus
Bay Rum
Beauty Berry
Blueberries
Blue Flowers
Bonsai
Bougainvillea
Bug Killer
Camellias
Cassia
Cereus
Chrysanthemums
Compost Bin
Crape Myrtle
Cuttings
Dandelion
Daylilies
Elderberry
Episcias
Ferns
Fuchsias
Geraniums
Herbs
Holiday Cactus
Hummingbirds
Iris
Kings Mantle
Lilacs
Liriope
Magnolia
Maple Leaf Hibiscus
Marsh Marigold
Orchids
Parsley
Pineapple
Poinsettia
Poison Ivy
Poppies
Pyracantha
Red Powder Puff
Roses
Small Back Yard
Snake Plant
Starting Seeds
Strawberries
Toxic Plants
Trumpet Vine
Tulips
Vegetables
Weeds
Xeriscaping
Zone Map

magnolia
Photo Credit: www.morguefile.com



The Magnificent Southern Magnolia

The Southern Magnolia (magnolia grandiflora), also known as 'Bullbay' is an evergreen, moderately large tree, attaining up to 100 feet in height with a straight 2 to 3 foot diameter trunk. It has an attractive symmetrical growing habits which makes it a desirable and ornamental landscape specimen.

Southern Magnolia is a well known and widely grown tree, native to the southeastern U.S. from North Carolina south to Florida and west through Lousiana, Mississippi, Arkansas and parts of eastern Texas.

It is hardy to zone 6 and will succeed in full sun, but is also very shade tolerant and can be found growing in rich well drained bottomlands along with other hardwood species that require moist soil conditions. There are no known destructive insect or disease pests.

The distinct leathery bright green foliage is glossy on the surface and has reddish brown wooly hair on the underside. Individual leaves are up to 8 inches long and 3 inches wide.

The tree produces a continuous display of huge showy flowers the size of dinner plates which are also edible. The gorgeous blossoms are creamy white, consisting of six to twelve upturned petals with yellow and purple stamens which are deliciously fragrant.

Blooming begins in spring and continues into summer, followed by conspicuous reddish orange fruit pods up to 4 inches long. The seeds themselves are about 1/2 inch long and ripen in the fall.

Being evergreen in habit, the Southern Magnolia tree makes a superior ornamental landscape addition which is magnificent even when not in bloom.


Home - Privacy Policy
copyright © 2006 - 2014 BackyardGarden.info all rights reserved
all content property of BackyardGarden.info and may not be copied or reproduced without permission